January 31 – Cyrus and John the Unmercinaries; John Bosco

Cyrus and John the Unmercinaries* (d. 304 or 311) were healers who healed for free, which is what “unmercinaries” means. (We pause a bit for our readers from the USA to process this amazing concept.) Cyrus, born of Christian parents in Alexandria, studied medicine at the University of Alexandria. Immediately out of the chute he… Continue reading January 31 – Cyrus and John the Unmercinaries; John Bosco

January 30 – Hippolytus of Rome; Mutien-Marie Wiaux

Hippolytus of Rome (ca. 170–ca. 236) was a prolific writer against heresies, as suggested by the title of his magnum opus, Refutation of All Heresies (he was not one to do things halfway). Nine of its ten volumes were lost until 1842, when copies of volumes IV–X were found in a monastery on Mount Athos*… Continue reading January 30 – Hippolytus of Rome; Mutien-Marie Wiaux

January 29 – Translation of the Relics of Ignatius of Antioch; Walloch of Scotland

Translation of the Relics of Ignatius (ca. 35–50 to ca. 98–117). Ignatius (aka Ignatius Nurono or “Ignatius of Fire[1]”) was the third (or second) bishop of Antioch, and one of the Apostolic Fathers*—early second-century writers identified by having been gathered into anthologies with “Apostolic Fathers” in the title. His feast feast is on December 20,… Continue reading January 29 – Translation of the Relics of Ignatius of Antioch; Walloch of Scotland

January 28 – Ephraim the Syrian; Thomas Aquinas

Ephraim the Syrian (ca. 306–373) was sired by a pagan priest in Nisibis (now split between Nusaybin, Turkey, and Qamishli, Syria) and baptised at 18 (or 28). He immediately began to compose hymns and metrical sermons in his native Syriac. He is especially known for didactic hymns against various heresies: Arianism, Manicheeism, Marcionism, Bardaisanism, and… Continue reading January 28 – Ephraim the Syrian; Thomas Aquinas

January 27 – Translation of the Relics of John Chrysostom; Angela Merici

Translation[1] of the Relics of John Chrysostom (347–407). As everybody except one of my sources knows, “Chrysostom” is Greek for “Golden Mouth” (NOT “golden tongue” for crying out loud, which would be “Chrysoglott,” which might suffice for a movie villain in a 1950’s “B” horror flick.) John was of course given that sobriquet due to… Continue reading January 27 – Translation of the Relics of John Chrysostom; Angela Merici