September 16 Saints of the Day – Ninian, and Edith of Wilton

On this day in 1620, the Mayflower began her voyage to North America. As the boat left the slip, the people on the pier distinctly heard a voice saying, “You should have gone before we left.” Ninian (360 – 432) was born on Albion’s fair isle (Britain), but there being a distinct lack of seminaries… Continue reading September 16 Saints of the Day – Ninian, and Edith of Wilton

September 15 Saints of the Day – Asclepiodote, Maximus, & Theodotus, and Catherine of Genoa

On this day in 1949, "The Lone Ranger" premiered on ABC-TV. Rossini has been rotating ever since. Unlike Theodotus, (whom we’ll get to anon), Asclepiodote and Maximus (IV cent.) were prominent citizens of Marcianopolis of Thrace (near present-day Devnya, Bulgaria) as our story opens. They were female and male, respectively (Aski is called a “womanmartyr,”… Continue reading September 15 Saints of the Day – Asclepiodote, Maximus, & Theodotus, and Catherine of Genoa

September 14 Feast of the Day – Exaltation of the Cross

On this day in 1741, George Frideric Handel completed his oratorio Messiah. Aaaaamen. Aaaaaamen. Aaaaaamen. Amen, Amen, Amen, Amen, Aaaaaaaamen (repeat for a total of 88 measures). The Feast of the Exaltation (Elevation) (Lifting Up) (Higherifying) of the Cross commemorates two separate events in the history of the True Cross™. The first is its finding… Continue reading September 14 Feast of the Day – Exaltation of the Cross

September 13 Saints of the Day – The Church of the Resurrection and John Chrysostom

On this day in 1743, Great Britain, Austria and the Kingdom of Sardinia signed the Treaty of Worms. The worms, illiterate, signed with an “X.” The Church of the Resurrection was consecrated on this day in 335. After Jerusalem was destroyed by the Romans in 70 AD, many holy places commemorated by Christians and Jews… Continue reading September 13 Saints of the Day – The Church of the Resurrection and John Chrysostom

September 12 Saints of the Day – Julian of Galatia and Guy of Anderlecht

On this day in 1940, cave paintings were discovered in Lascaux, France. Adjacent hieroglyphics read, “Og’s Buffalo Meat — Always Fresh.” Julian of Galatia (IV cent.), a presbyter, served the divine liturgy for forty laypeople, with whom he lived in a cave near Ancyra (aka Ankara aka Angora of cat, goat, and bunny fame). At… Continue reading September 12 Saints of the Day – Julian of Galatia and Guy of Anderlecht