September 21 Saints of the Day – John Maisuradze and Matthew the Apostle

On this day in 1897, the "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus" editorial was published in the New York Sun. This was followed in rapid succession by “Yes, Dakota, there is an Easter Bunny,” and “Yes, Colorado, there is a Zig-Zag Man.” John Maisuradze (ca. 1882 – 1957), after helping to rebuild a monastery… Continue reading September 21 Saints of the Day – John Maisuradze and Matthew the Apostle

September 20 Saints of the Day – Eustace and Andrew Kim Taegon

On this day in 480 BC, the Greeks defeated the Persians in the Battle of Salamis. Sadly they later lost the battle of Pastramis-on-Rye. There once was a saint named Eustace (d. 118), and he almost deserved to have Shakespeare write his vita. As Placidus, he was an officer in the Roman army, but one… Continue reading September 20 Saints of the Day – Eustace and Andrew Kim Taegon

September 19 Saints of the Day – Theodore the Black and Susanna the Deaconness

On this day in 1959, Nikita Khrushchev was barred from visiting Disneyland due to security concerns. He had refused to let the Themepark Security Administration inspect his shoes. Theodore the Black (d. 1298) of Smolensk was a swarthy lad, and a swarthy lad was he. (Nobody implicated his mother in anything and we’re not going… Continue reading September 19 Saints of the Day – Theodore the Black and Susanna the Deaconness

September 18 Saints of the Day – Hilarion of Optina and John Macias

On this day in 1928, Juan de la Cierva made the first crossing of the English Channel by autogyro (which he invented). He made the return trip after he knew his mother-in-law had gone home. Hilarion of Optina (1805 – 1873) was born on Pascha night, as was our salvation. He was apparently mocked for… Continue reading September 18 Saints of the Day – Hilarion of Optina and John Macias

September 17 Saints of the Day – Agathocleia, and Hildegard of Bingen

On this day in 1814, Francis Scott Key finished his poem “Defence of Fort McHenry,” better known as “The Star-Spangled Banner.” On the bottom he scratched, “Note to self: set this to a singable tune.” <strongAgathocleia (d. ca. 230) was a slave, which is bad enough right there, but it gets worse. Her owners were… Continue reading September 17 Saints of the Day – Agathocleia, and Hildegard of Bingen