References

Shelf of Antique BooksAn Annotated Bibliography

Abba Moses—Very brief bios of Orthodox saints. Mostly taken from the Prologue but sometimes comes up with tidbits not in the other sources. http://www.abbamoses.com/

Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese—Used infrequently. http://www.orthodoxchristian.info/pages/index.html

Apostolic Fathers—Book on paper; writings of the, well, the Apostolic Fathers*, innit? Pick your own translation; I used the Penguin.

Bible—Kind of a “no duh” source for biblical personalities. I most frequently used the Bible Gateway website. For translations I mostly used the RSV, NEB, and KJV. https://www.biblegateway.com/

Catholic Encyclopedia (1909)—Has a rather heavy anti-Orthodox slant, but many saints and much information on historic events. Indeed sometimes there is far more arcane information than most people could want. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/

Catholic Online—An incomplete and not entirely reliable (either for content or dates) set of saints, but lots of personal information that other sources omit. http://www.catholic.org/saints/

Christian Classics Etherial Library—Collection of ancient and medieval writings of the Fathers. Used infrequently. http://www.ccel.org/fathers.html

Ecclesiastical History of the English People—Book on paper by the Venerable Bede*. Invaluable for late Celtic/early English British saints, if of questionable reliability. Many translations and versions exist. Find your own.

Google Maps—Source of highway designators, driving directions, distance calculations, etc. https://www.google.com/maps

Great Collection of the Lives of the Saints—Book on paper, translated by Father Thomas Marretta from the 1914 original by St. Demetrius of Rostov. In 12 volumes. Rather florid and including many details other sources are wary of. House Springs, MO: Chrysostom Press, 1995.

Greek Orthodox Archdiocese in America—Used infrequently. http://www.goarch.org/

Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Other Principal Saints—Butler’s famous collection. Used infrequently. http://www.bartleby.com/210/

Lives of the Saints—Book on paper by Omer Englebert. The dates are pre-Vatican II, making it a bit difficult to use. NY: Barnes & Noble, 1994. (Originally published in 1951.)

Mystagogy: The Weblog of John Sanidopoulos—Rich in detail for the few Orthodox saints I found there. http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/

Orthodox Church in America—#1 source for Orthodox saints. An almost complete set. (Kids! Trade! Collect them all!) http://oca.org/saints/lives/

OrthodoxWiki—#2 source for Orthodox saints. Not as comprehensive as OCA but has more pre-schism western saints. A fair bit of editorializing, with a bit of an anti-Catholic slant. http://orthodoxwiki.org/Main_Page

Prologue from Ochrid—Book on paper. Republished in paperback as Prologue of Ohrid. Four-volume set (two volumes in paperback) of lives of Orthodox saints with sermonettes and prayers. By St. Nikolai Velimirovic (†1956). Incomplete and sketchy, yet a good source for some of the more obscure ancient saints. Birmingham: Lazarica Press, 1985.

Saints Behaving Badly—Book on paper by Thomas Craughwell. Sometimes-wry look at saints with iffy backgrounds. NY: Doubleday, 2006.

St. Patrick Catholic Church, D.C.—One of two chief sources of Catholic Saints (with SQPN). A comprehensive set of Catholic saints by Katherine I. Rabenstein. Her research is excellent, and she includes obscure saints often overlooked by other sources. Includes a fair bit of editorializing, of the “let us emulate” variety. http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/saint_a.shtml

Sayings of the Desert Fathers—Book on paper by Benedicta Ward. Excellent source for the Desert Fathers, although more for anecdotes than biography. Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1975.

SQPN—One of two chief sources of Catholic saints (with St. Patrick’s). Comprehensive lists arranged by name, date, and patronage. http://saints.sqpn.com/alphabetical-list/

Wikipedia—My most-used source, although generally not my main source for any given saint. Has a surprising number of Catholic and Orthodox saints, and gives some of the spicier details the religious websites hold back. I also used it for research on historic events, places, and non-saints, not to mention about half of my historical teasers. http://www.wikipedia.org/

Wisdom of the Celtic Saints—Book on paper by Edward C. Sellner. Excellent source of anecdotes. Notre Dame, Indiana: Ave Maria Press, 1993.

Women Philosophers—Used infrequently. Good site for the more theologically outspoken women saints. http://www.women-philosophers.com/Women-Philosophers-Index.html

Other sites & books—In addition to these sources, I also used websites and books specific to individual saints, often one-offs by societies, orders, monasteries, or churches, usually found by googling when my regular sources let me down. I also used a number of Coptic sites for saints we share with the Copts, and Jewish sites for Old Testament saints. Plus really miscellaneous stuff such as newspapers, historical societies, online dictionaries, the Tolkien Wiki, etc.